FROM LIBERTY TO BREST-LITOVSK

THE FIRST YEAR OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION

BY

ARIADNA TYRK”VA-WILLIAMS
(Mrs. HAROLD WILLIAMS)


MacMillan & Co., Limited
St. Martin’s Street, London
1919



Ariadna Tyrkova

Ariadna Tyrkova, the daughter of a landowner, was born in Novogorod in 1869.  Tyrkova took no interest in politics until her brother was arrested and exiled for being a member of the People’s Will.

Tyrkova had wanted to become a doctor but the policies of Alexander III made this an impossibility.  She joined the illegal Social Democratic Labour Party and in 1903 was arrested and charged with smuggling radical newspapers into Russia.  She managed to escape and fled to Germany.

In exile Tyrkova lived with Peter Struve and his family in Stuttgart.  She returned to Russia after the 1905 Revolution.  Over the next few years Tyrkova became one of the most important leaders of the Women's Liberation movement in Russia.

Tyrkova became disillusioned with the various revolutionary groups and joined the Constitutional Democrat Party (Cadets) party.  She also married the English journalist, Harold Williams.

After the October Revolution Tyrkova went to live in London where she formed the Russian Liberation Committee.  Ariadna Tyrkova died in 1962.



Ariadna Vladimirovna Tyrkova-Williams, a Russian journalist and leading member of the Constitutional Democrat (Kadet) Party.  She and her husband, Harold Williams, also a journalist (and later Foreign Affairs Editor of The Times), in 1919-1920 were with the British Military Mission to General Denikin.  Mrs. Tyrkova-Williams remained active in the White Movement after the Civil War, was an organiser of the Russian Liberation Committee in London, edited the Committee's publications and, among other things, raised money for the relief of orphaned Russian children.